UBU GALLERY infos

UBU GALLERY

2020

Nils Karsten: Holidays in the Sun…Be Back Never!
November 9, 2020 – January 15, 2021
In my head, I am constantly culling images, no matter where I am nor what I am doing. The drawings in the exhibition are the results of playing out stories; thinking (out loud) and daydreaming my own narratives, very much influenced by current socio-political events and childhood memories. A finished drawing is the final still of a time-based narration that has been constantly modified. There is a cinematic flow, almost like a graphic novel; sabotaged, of course, with no real beginning nor end and the absence of frames. I draw from pictures and from memory, I trace, I scribble, I destroy and I resurrect. I shift from conscious mark making to automatic, blind doodlings.

These drawings are intimate play dates with my mind, that’s why they often turn out to be so intense and busy. In some ways, I still draw like my pre-teen self, when I burned down pirate ships, stabbed every sailor until the water turned blood red and the piece of paper was filled with black smoke. The battle defined the composition. I still see the storyline of my childhood drawings forty years later. I never stopped drawing this way.

Nils KarstenBeach Life (& Death), 2020, Graphite on paper, 13 7/8 x 10 7/8 inches (35.2 x 27.6 cm)
Most of the drawings in the exhibition are “beach scenes.” The beach is a transitional space between two worlds, ocean and land, where the rules of neither world apply. One of my favorite landscapes is Germany’s northern coastal “Watt,” in particular the peninsula Eiderstedt where growing up I often spent parts of my summers. The Wadden Sea is an intertidal zone in the southeastern part of the North Sea. It lies between the coast of northwestern continental Europe and the range of low-lying Frisian Islands, forming a shallow body of water with tidal flats and wetlands. I walk the “Watt” as it constantly changes, coming and going, never still… It delivers and it washes away, in-between is a perpetual condition.

My stories play in these in-between spaces. My beaches are conveniently located between the gates of a bubble-gum heaven and some eternal dumpster, call it hell, an angel’s La La Land, where physics and ethics are redefined, and unity seems only possible as a Sisyphean struggle between one side and the other. Peace here is movement; struggle is the best possible peace. I think of these drawings as fun-loving days at the beach, in a Hieronymus Bosch-ian kind of way. Fun can turn into gruesome horror as much as great joy. Or both…

There was a time when the idea of heaven gave me comfort, but I gave up on that. The heaven I once knew and which comforted me has evaporated. Now it’s bubble-gum occupied and claimed by patriots and fundamentalists, fanatics swarming the beaches to plant their flags and to get a good tan line. I was always more interested in life before death than life after death.

Farewell pink flamingo!

 
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František Vobecký: Photomontages 1935-1938
On view through March 13, 2020

In collaboration with Galerie Julian Sander

Ubu Gallery is exhibiting the Surrealist-influenced photomontages of František Vobecký (1902–1991) made between 1935 and 1938. While Vobecký originally took up photography as a means of documenting his paintings, shortly thereafter he started photographing found objects and details of rocks and sculptures. From there he moved to simple still lifes of ordinary household or everyday objects and subsequently, in 1935, began his exploration of photomontage.
František VobeckýDance, 1936, reprint 1974, Gelatin silver print, 15 3/4 x 11 1/2 inches (40 x 29.2 cm)
The influence of Surrealism (of which photomontage was a principal approach) in Czechoslovakia was pervasive during the 1930s, and it gradually replaced Functionalism and Constructivism as the principal ideology of the avant-garde. Surrealism dominated the “International Exhibition of Photography” organized by S.V.U. Mánes (Mánes Union of Fine Arts) in Prague in 1936. Certain series of photographic assemblages produced by Vobecký between 1935 and 1938 (on view at Ubu Gallery) were included in this important exhibition, the largest presentation of its kind in the 1930s. The 1936 exhibition led to the founding of the Photographic Section of S.V.U. Mánes, an official endorsement of photography by the most prominent artistic organization in Czechoslovakia.
  
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2019

BUGGED OUT: Representations of Arthropods in Modern & Contemporary Art

Help us celebrate the closing of the exhibition with a spontaneous reception, Friday, December 20th from 6:00-8:00PM!

Humans have evolved relatively recently in a world long replete with Arthropods, which constitute the largest phylum of creatures on Earth both in terms of number of species and in total number of individuals. There are nearly a million species of Arthropods, with over 90% of them being insects. Sharing a world with this horde, humans have formed relationships with insects in many ways. Sometimes humans and insects influence each other minimally, other times we profoundly impact each other. Look for evidence of our relationship with insects and it will appear all around you, particularly in the works of artists.
Left: Heide HatryJennifer, 2008, Silver Halide print, 12 x 18 inches (30.5 x 45.7 cm)
Right: Gaston Paris, Untitled (mannequin by Sonia Mossé for the Exposition Internationale du Surréalisme) 1938 (printed later/ probably 1960s), Gelatin silver print, 7 7/8 x 7 3/4 inches (20 x 19.7 cm)
Insects have always been a part of the cultural history and creativity of our species. The spectrum of insect art recorded on the walls of ancient caves and on artefacts of past civilizations, and the exhibits and festivals dedicated to insect‐related art found in the streets and galleries of modern societies are a testament to this long and interesting relationship between insects and human artists. Insects provide inspiration, subject matter, and sometimes even the raw materials for the artisan. The ubiquitousness of insects and the boundless imagination and creativity of humans should ensure the continued relevance of insects in the artistic ventures of humans well into the future. Ultimately, all art can reveal aspects of our history, and insect art profoundly documents the history of our relationship with insects.
  
Grand Palais, Paris
17–20 October 2019 | Booth 0.E40
Vernissage: 16 October 2019
HAPPY 25th ANNIVERSARY, UBU!
David Hare, Untitled (from “VVV Portfolio”), ca. 1942, Toned vintage gelatin silver print from a heat-altered negative (“brulage”), 11 7/8 x 9 3/4 inches (30.2 x 24.8 cm)
Help us celebrate the founding of Ubu Gallery in 1994 with a selection of works from our artists and exhibitions over the past 25 years!

Featured Artists: Vito Acconci, Julian Beck, Hans Bellmer, Denise Bellon, Bob Brown, Joseph Cornell, Raphael Delorme, Marc Eemans, Max Ernst, Brion Gysin, David Hare, Marta Hoepffner, Georges Hugnet, Marcel Jean, Gerome Kamrowski, Thérèse Le Prat, Nathan Lerner, Boris Lipnitzki, Andre Racz, Pierre Roy, Kurt Schwitters, Bernard Schultze, Arthur Siegel, Jindřich Štyrský, Yves Tanguy, Karel Teige, Raoul Ubac, Unica Zürn

  
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2017

Judit Reigl: Weightlessness

Exhibition Extended

Ubu Gallery’s exhibition of Judit Reigl’s Weightlessness paintings (formally Expérience d’apensenteur, 1965–1966) has been extended.

We are pleased to announce that Weightlessness will remain on display until December 21, 2018.

Judit ReiglWeightlessness, 1966, Oil on canvas, 35 1/2 x 45 1/2 inches (90.2 x 115.6 cm)
  
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Grand Palais, Paris
18–21 October 2018 | Booth 0.E40
Vernissage: 17 October 2018
HOMMAGE À DANIEL CORDIER
Featured Artists: Hans Bellmer, Brassaï, César, Dado, Fred Deux, Christian D´Orgeix, Jean Dubuffet, Marchel Duchamp, Öyvind Fahlström, Yolande Fièvre, Hessie, Matta, Henri Michaux, Jean Pierre Raynaud, Bernard Réquichot, Bernard Schultze, Ursula

Adventurer. This is surely the word that obviously embodies Daniel Cordier. Born in 1920 and now 98 years old, this native of Bordeaux has had several lives in one. A World War II Resister at 20 years old, he became the secretary to Jean Moulin, on whom he authored a milestone biography.

Jean Moulin introduced him to modern art. Ironically, it was by opening the Galerie Romanin in Nice in 1943, which they used as a cover for their Resistance activities, that Cordier discovered with curiosity and passion the world of art. At the end of WW II, his growing interest in art turned him into a budding collector. There were seminal meetings, among them with Bernard Réquichot, an exciting young artist he collected and exhibited later.

At the end of 1956 on rue de Duras in front of the Elysée Palace, Daniel Cordier opened his first commercial gallery, before moving to rue de Miromesnil in 1959, where at year-end he hosted the legendary Exposition inteRnatiOnale du Surréalisme (read EROS), organized by André Breton and Marcel Duchamp. His pioneering spirit was obvious. Cordier took risks. He dared. He was the first to show artists never previously exhibited in France, among them Henri Michaux in 1959 and Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns in 1960.

Bernard RéquichotPapiers choisis, 1961, Halftone cut-outs glued to painted canvas, 24 x 18 1/8 inches
The adventure of Cordier’s Parisian gallery, relatively brief but very full, ended in June 1964 with the exhibition “Eight Years of Agitation.” He also had galleries in Frankfurt (1959–1962) and two briefly in New York – Cordier–Warren (1961–1962), followed by Cordier & Ekström (1962–1966). During the decade of his gallery involvement, he was at times the dealer of Hans Bellmer, Jean Dubuffet, Matta and Henri Michaux, as well as having a significant relationship with Marcel Duchamp.

Notably, this avant-garde and generous dealer and collector made several donations to the French State, perhaps totaling as many as 1,000 works. More than a month before Sotheby’s Paris announced its recently-held sale “Alias Daniel Cordier,” which may have largely dispersed the balance of his impressive collection, Ubu began collecting works around the theme “Homage to Daniel Cordier” to present at FIAC 2018. On view will be approximately 50 works, some with the provenance of Cordier, most created at or around the time Cordier exhibited and collected these artists.

Ubu’s “Hommage à Daniel Cordier” pays tribute to this man of courage and vision; a boundary breaker; a life long and well lived; and most importantly as it relates to Ubu’s presentation, to his fabulous and uncompromising taste.

  
UBU GALLERY    416  EAST  59  STREET  NEW  YORK  NY  10022   T:  212.753.4444     
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Judit Reigl: Weightlessness

September 28 – November 30, 2018
Reception: Friday, September 28, 6:00 – 8:00PM

Ubu Gallery’s exhibition of Judit Reigl’s Weightlessness paintings (formally Expérience d’apensenteur, 1965–1966) is the first ever to be exclusively dedicated to this important series. It is also the third solo exhibition presented by Ubu of Reigl, one of the most original figures of post-World War II art. Reigl is hailed for discarding boundaries and rules once deemed absolute. Now 95, Reigl defies traditional and often antagonistic dichotomies as she obliterates the distinction between the front and back of the canvas, utilizing both sides of the work, alternates between the figurative and non-objective and reconciles aspects of Surrealism and abstraction.
Judit ReiglWeightlessness, 1966, Oil on canvas, 45 x 35 inches (114.3 x 88.9 cm)
According to the critic Marcia E. Vetrocq, “Reigl had been working on the abstract series Mass Writing (Ecriture en mass, 1956–1966) when its jagged zones of paint began to expand and evoke fragments of the deconstructed body. She discerned the start of a new series, Weightlessness, whose abstraction then yielded to the overtly figurative paintings of Man (Homme, 1966–1972).” Rectangles of roughly 45 x 35 inches (115 x 90 cm), the Weightlessness canvases comprise the final subseries of Mass Writing. While the paintings of the  Weightlessness series are readily distinguishable from the rest of her oeuvre by their relatively small size, they are also recognizable by virtue of Reigl’s use of a well-respected painter’s trick. For her earlier Mass Writing paintings, Reigl propped large, stretched canvases against the studio wall and troweled on the paint with upward motions. The ascending movement, preserved as rich texture, is accented by the occasional drip. In making the Weightlessness series, to reinforce the effect of the upward flow, Reigl applied thick layers of paint and then turned the wet painting upside down to dry, thereby adding the pull of gravity to her effort. With the canvas rotated back, the paint, flouting Newton’s law of universal gravitation, sags and drips upward. This sensation of weightlessness derives not only from the texture and the drips; the sharply divided forms of the paintings seem to rise from the canvas, equally defying the gravitational pull.Reigl’s escape from her native Hungary for Paris in 1950 was arduous and perilous. In 1954, André Breton presented Reigl’s first solo exhibition; since then she has shown consistently in museums and galleries throughout Europe and the United States. Most recently, the Musée d’Art Moderne in Paris mounted a survey of her work and she will be included in the Metropolitan Museum’s Epic Abstraction: Pollock to Herrera exhibition, which opens on December 17th. .

Ubu’s presentation coincides with an exhibition of the artist’s recent drawings, Judit Reigl: Dance of Death, at the Shepherd W & K Galleries located at 58 East 79th Street, New York NY and on view from September 25–October 20, 2018. Both exhibitions are presented in collaboration with Janos Gat Gallery.

Please view Ubu’s previous exhibitions of Judit Reigl Unfolding Unfolding and Annus Mirabilis, Annus Horribilis: Works from May 1954–June 1955.

  
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SADE: Artists Under the Influence

March 21 – June 29, 2018
Ubu Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of works picturing or directly referencing the Marquis de Sade (Donatien Alphonse François de Sade, 2 June 1740 – 2 December 1814). Sade’s influence is keenly perceived and felt in the works of the Surrealists, which sought to liberate and give expression to the mysterious and aggressive drives lurking within the unconscious mind. Surrealist artists, such as Hans Bellmer and Man Ray, made use of ideas, themes, and scenarios based on Sade’s writings. In the fictive realm of art, they attempted to emulate Sade – as well as other, later écrivains maudits of the 19th Century, like Lautréamont and Rimbaud – by giving free rein of expression to all manner of psychopathological impulses and wanton paraphilia, including rape, murder, sodomy, coprophilia, and blasphemy.
Featured Artists: 
Hans Bellmer
, Jean Benoît, William Copley (CPLY), Gilles Ehrmann, Man Ray, Jindřich Štyrský
Man RayPortrait imaginaire de D.A.F. de Sade, Lithograph, 28 7/8 x 20 1/2 in. (73.3 x 52.1 cm)
  
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Les Mystères de la chambre noire:
Photographic Surrealism, 1920-1950
Exhibition extended through September 29
Hans BellmerNous la suivons à pas lents, [“We Follow Her with Slow Steps”], 1937 (printed 1963 or earlier), Hand-colored gelatin silver print on original masonite mount, 58 1/4 x 39 3/8 inches (148 x 100 cm), Signed on recto
UBU GALLERY    416  EAST  59  STREET  NEW  YORK  NY  10022   T:  212.753.4444   F:  212.753.4470
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Les Mystères de la chambre noire:
Photographic Surrealism, 1920-1950
Summer closing from July 31—September 5
Exhibition reopening September 6—29
Soichi SunamiObject of Meret Oppenheim (fur-covered cup, saucer & spoon), 1936, Vintage gelatin silver print, 7 3/8 x 9 1/4 inches (18.7 x 23.5 cm), MoMA press photograph with multiple stamps & paper labels on verso
UBU GALLERY    416  EAST  59  STREET  NEW  YORK  NY  10022   T:  212.753.4444   F:  212.753.4470
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Ubu Gallery 2


Les Mystères de la chambre noire:
Photographic Surrealism, 1920-1950
Summer closing from July 31—September 5
Exhibition reopening September 6—29
Soichi SunamiObject of Meret Oppenheim (fur-covered cup, saucer & spoon), 1936, Vintage gelatin silver print, 7 3/8 x 9 1/4 inches (18.7 x 23.5 cm), MoMA press photograph with multiple stamps & paper labels on verso
UBU GALLERY    416  EAST  59  STREET  NEW  YORK  NY  10022   T:  212.753.4444   F:  212.753.4470
INFO@UBUGALLERY.COM   WWW.UBUGALLERY.COM   GALLERY HOURS: M—F  11  AM  TO  6  PM
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